How fast would society as we know it come to an end?

by bookchick@evpl on Wednesday, September 1 2010, 4:39pm. Viewed 1,019 times.

I just finished a book that I found to be profoundly disturbing.

I read a lot of apocalyptic literature, real end of the world type stuff and this book sounded like others I had read. Chaos, people running amok, blah, blah, blah... But it wasn't WHAT I was reading that made this book disturbing it was how I was FEELING.

David Moody has done a masterful job of projecting emotions in Hater. I felt the mundaneness and boredom of the main character. I experienced the confusion, panic, and then chaos as the story unfolded. Most of all there was the hatred.

It's a good book. It's a quick read. And, if you like it, you'll be pleased to know that it is also a trilogy. The second installment is called Dog Blood and is available now at EVPL. The last in the trilogy will be called Killer or Victim but the release date isn't set as of yet.

Check out his website. http://www.djmoody.co.uk/

book jacket     book jacket 

 

If you like apocalyptic fiction like I do try these other great reads.

book jacket don't let the Young Adult label scare you off! book jacket   book Jacket 

book jacket   book jacket


Comments (2)

Have something to say? Share your comments by signing in to your account, then returning to this page.

on Saturday, September 4 2010, 10:10am

Pingback from  Twitter Trackbacks for                 Evansville Vanderburgh Public Library         [evpl.org]        on Topsy.com

gawell@evpl wrote
on Wednesday, September 8 2010, 11:51am

About as fast as it took societies to start.

Sometimes in a blink, or a wink.

Usually it's more of a slow and drawn out affair.

Apocalypse implies a larger scale that seems to hardly ever fulfill its promise. I suppose that's the good news.

Peregrination: Transplanting in another country,

or traveling into foreign lands.

‘the passage now presents no hindrance

To the spirit unappeased and peregrine

Between two worlds become much like each other.’

~ from ‘Little Gidding’ ~ Eliot