EVPL Communities: mrsweasley@evpl's Blog Postshttp://evpl.org/community/blogs/All of mrsweasley@evpl's blog posts on the EVPL Communities site.en-USCommunityServer 2008 SP1 (Build: 30619.63) <![CDATA[Books to Warm your Heart]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2010/02/01/books-to-warm-your-heart.aspx Mon, 01 Feb 2010 16:57:00 G2T 2053 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/" target="_blank">Kids Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2010/02/01/books-to-warm-your-heart.aspx to post your comments!

February is full of holidays and special events, and we have books for every occasion. Here are some heart-warming books for that chilly mid-winter holiday, Valentine's Day ( February 14) and a bonus book for Black History Month.

Dog meets Cat (and falls in love). They don't speak the same language. Are they doomed to misunderstand each other, or is there hope for this mismatched pair? Ahhh...but there is a universal language. Find out what it is in Woof: a Love Story by Sarah Weeks.

Henry in Love is another gentle story of young love. In this book, a blueberry muffin, a football player and a teacher's penchant for rearranging her classroom all figure in advancing Henry's dream romance. By Peter McCarty, the Caldecott Honor recipient for Hondo and Fabian.

"Silly as a seal/rugged as a moose/happy as a herd of hippos drinking apple juice...." Those are just a few of the ways your heart can feel according to author/illustrator Michael Hall in My Heart is Like a Zoo. Heart-shaped art graces the pages while nimble verse describes a range of emotions in terms easily grasped by children. Try counting the hearts, exploring the colors and shapes, or making your own heart-shaped art.

For Black History month, check out Back of the Bus by Aaron Reynolds.  I've been a fan of Reynolds since his first book, Chicks and Salsa, a wacky barnyard tale complete with recipes for Mexican fare from this chef-turned-writer. In Back of the Bus he surprised me with his range as a writer, serving up a thoughtful, sometimes poetic retelling of the Rosa Parks story from the perspective of a young boy on that same bus. He deftly captures the thoughts and emotions of a little boy whose ordinary bus ride (and consequently, his life) is transformed by one courageous action. Back of the Bus is illustrated by the inimitable Floyd Cooper, whose warm, sunlit palette evokes a dawning of aspiration through the colors of a workday sunset.

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books Black History Valentines Day authors and illustrators
<![CDATA[Counting to Christmas]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2009/12/02/counting-to-christmas.aspx Wed, 02 Dec 2009 15:13:00 G12T 1965 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/" target="_blank">Kids Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2009/12/02/counting-to-christmas.aspx to post your comments!

Counting to ChristmasWaiting for an anticipated event (like Christmas) can be very difficult for young children, who have not developed a sense of the passage of time. Here are some books to help them count down the days.

Counting to Christmas by Nancy Tafuri  is a large-format book with bright, simple illustrations. A little girl spends the days before Christmas preparing to share and give. One of her projects is a tree filled with treats for the wildlife near her home. Recipes for outdoor animal treats and other projects are included.

Snowbear's Christmas CountdownSnowbear finds numerous ways to fill his days in Snowbear's Christmas Countdown by Theresa Smythe. From decorating his house to cracking nuts with his new nutcracker (and including spending couple of days in bed with a cold, watching holiday movies), Snowbear stays busy preparing to enjoy Christmas with his friends. Kids will like the lively illustrations, and may be inspired by Snowbear's creativity and caring. A plus for parents and teachers is that this book uses ordinal numbers (1st, 2nd, 3rd, etc.) for the countdown.

Counting ChristmasKaren Katz's Counting Christmas  features her trademark folk art-like illustrations.  Charming round-faced, rosy-cheeked children take part in traditional Christmas activities in a warm, family-centered setting. Nothing new here, but Katz's illustrations are worth the trip.

Uno, Dos, Tres, Posada!Uno, Dos, Tres, Posada! introduces the Hispanic custom of the nine-night posada and its traditions, such as the candy-filled piñata and fuego artificiales (fireworks). Spanish words share the page with the mostly English verse, with abundant clues in the context and illustrations to clarify their meanings.

And here's a simple craft idea you can use at Christmas, or leading up to any special event, like a birthday or vacation. Make a paper chain using colored strips of paper, one link for each day before the event. Decorate as you please, perhaps putting numbers on each link, or adding stickers, etc. Hang the chain in a conspicuous place, and allow the child to tear off one link each day. It will serve as a tangible reminder of the approaching event, and help children visualize the concept of time passing.

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books Christmas counting
<![CDATA[Two Books for Boys (and Adventurous Girls)]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2009/11/25/two-books-for-boys-and-adventerous-girls.aspx Wed, 25 Nov 2009 12:53:00 G11T 1953 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/" target="_blank">Kids Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2009/11/25/two-books-for-boys-and-adventerous-girls.aspx to post your comments!

Kids who enjoy stories about knights in armor and medieval life will want to read Roland Wright, Future Knight. Ten-year-old Roland longs to be knight, but that's an honor reserved for the noble class, and not the son of a blacksmith. When armor made by Roland's father saves the king's life, the unthinkable happens: the king invites the blacksmith to send his son to the castle to be trained as a page, the first step in becoming a knight.  But which son?  Roland has a brother, and both want to go to the castle. How will their father decide?

Roland Wright, Future Knight is the first book in a series by Tony Davis. Scattered skillfully into the narrative are nuggets of factual information about medieval life, chivalry, armor-making  and the training of knights. Young readers won't even know that they're learning history as they follow the adventures of Roland Wright, Future Knight.

For readers who like their action non-stop and over-the-top, check out Doc Wilde and the Frogs of Doom. Grandpa Wilde is missing (again!), so Dr. Spartacus Wilde and his children Brian and Wren set out for the rainforests of South America to save him from ...frogs? The fantastic plot is matched with comic book-style action, snappy dialogue and the preposterously perfect Wilde family. Lots of fun for would-be adventurers!

 

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books adventure stories
<![CDATA[Books for Boys and Ghouls]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2009/10/23/books-for-boys-and-ghouls.aspx Fri, 23 Oct 2009 13:50:00 G10T 1913 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/" target="_blank">Kids Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2009/10/23/books-for-boys-and-ghouls.aspx to post your comments!

With just about a week left until Halloween, most of the Halloween books in our Holiday collections have been snapped up and won't reappear until at least the Day of the Dead (Nov. 1). But here's a monstrous secret: many spooky stories are not found in the Holiday collection. Here are some books that will put a shiver up your spine or a coax a cackle from you, all found in our Picture Book, Easy Reader, Fiction, or Non-fiction collections.

Monster GooseFrankenstein makes a sandwichRunaway MummyPicture Books Frankenstein Makes a Sandwich and Frankenstein Takes the Cake by Adam Rex consist of humorous verse about the trials of being a monster, with illustrations reminiscent of classic monster flix by the author. Michael Rex (no relation, as far as I can tell) gives us Goodnight Goon and The Runaway Mummy,  good-natured monster's-eye parodies of Margaret Wise Brown's beloved bedtime stories.

Another parody favorite is Judy Sierra's gruesome reworkings of familiar nursery rhymes, Monster Goose, found on our shelves at 811.54 SIERR.

 For little ones who need to be reassured that monsters can be conquered, try Go Away, Big Green Monster by Ed Emberley. The scary Big Green Monster is disassembled piece by piece as you turn the die-cut pages in an empowering lapsit experience. Pair that with Sesame Street "monster"Lovable Furry Old Grover in The Monster at the End of This Book by Jon Stone.

Other gentle ghost stories for the younger set are Ghosts in the House  and Hush, Baby Ghostling. Get kids involved in the story with the very slightly scary (but mostly fun) Can YOU Make a Scary Face?

Cinderella SkeletonScary Stories to Tell in the DarkIn a Dark, Dark RoomThe Witch Who Was Afraid of WitchesBeginning readers will enjoy Alice Low's The Witch Who Was Afraid of Witches or In a Dark, Dark Room, and Other Scary Stories by Alvin Schwartz in our Easy Reader collection.

Alvin Schwartz also authored the ever-popular Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark Series, which you'll find at 398.25 SCHWA. While you're in the 398s, pick up Cinderella Skeleton (398.2 SAN ) by Robert D. San Souci, a rhymed retelling of Cinderella with artwork by David Catrow that may remind you of the movie Corpse Bride.

 

Wolves in the WallsCoralineThe Graveyard BookThe Book of GhostsLurking in the juvenile fiction collection (and currently on the NEW shelf) is The Book of Ghosts. Selected and illustrated by father-son artists Michael and Devon Hague, The Book of Ghosts is a collection of classic ghost stories from masters such as Edgar Allan Poe, H. P. Lovecraft and other well-known writers. It includes that standard for creepy suspense, "The Monkey's Paw," by W. W. Jacobs.

Contemporary author Neil Gaiman follows neatly in the footsteps of classic horror/suspense writers. He was recognized with a Newbery Medal earlier this year for his creepy fantasy The Graveyard Book. If you missed some of his earlier children's fare, check out Coraline (also available as a graphic novel) and The Wolves in the Walls to give yourself a Halloween treat.

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tall tales Halloween skeletons spooky stories haunted house ghost
<![CDATA[Animals and ABCs]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2009/10/20/animals-and-abcs.aspx Tue, 20 Oct 2009 13:51:00 G10T 1908 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/" target="_blank">Kids Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2009/10/20/animals-and-abcs.aspx to post your comments!

Creature ABC

Kids love animals, so Creature ABC will fascinate them with its range of familiar and not-so-familiar beasts.Photographs from Andrew Zuckerman's 2007 work Creature are arranged  alphabet-book style, with a letter and photograph on facing pages, then another photograph and a word on the next 2-page spread.

The photographs have to be seen to appreciate their detail, clarity and expressiveness.  Some of the smaller animals (fish, bird, frog) are about life size and all are reproduced in brilliant color. Kids and adults will enjoy looking at this book together. I predict that the kids will not want to put it down, and adults will sneak back for another peek.

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animals books alphabet
<![CDATA[Mercy Watson to the Rescue!]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2009/08/06/mercy-watson-to-the-rescue.aspx Thu, 06 Aug 2009 14:50:00 G8T 1738 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/" target="_blank">Kids Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2009/08/06/mercy-watson-to-the-rescue.aspx to post your comments!

When my husband and I travel, I always bring audiobooks to pass the time. Last week we took a trip to Michigan with two of our grandchildren, ages 4 and 6. I knew I would need audiobooks to keep them occupied, but how could I please everyone? What could I bring that would entertain both children and adults?

Mercy Watson to the Rescue! 

I was very familiar with books by Kate DiCamillo, who penned the Newbery honor book Because of Winn-Dixie and Newbery Medal winner The Tale of Despereaux, but I had never gotten around to reading her easy chapter book series about Mercy Watson. I checked out the three audiobook CDs that contain all six of the Mercy Watson stories. We were not disappointed!

Mercy Watson is a pig who lives with Mr. & Mrs. Watson. They treat her almost as a daughter, to the vexation of their neighbor Eugenia Lincoln and the secret delight of Eugenia's sister Baby. Mercy is an unassuming pig who cares about little more than where to get her next helping of toast with a great deal of butter on it. Nevertheless, Mercy gets involved in a number of hilarious adventures (with the occasional oblique cultural reference thrown in for the adults to chuckle over).

We listened to all six stories at least twice and found ourselves quoting lines from the books throughout the vacation. I recommend that you check out a book or audiobook from the series, make yourself some toast with a great deal of butter on it, and sit down for a nice visit with Mercy, the Watsons, Eugenia & Baby Lincoln, and -oh, yes-the fire department.

 

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pig easy readers books audiobooks Mercy Watson Kate DiCamillo
<![CDATA[Celebrate Poetry Month!]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2009/04/21/celebrate-poetry-month.aspx Tue, 21 Apr 2009 15:05:00 G4T 1440 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/" target="_blank">Kids Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2009/04/21/celebrate-poetry-month.aspx to post your comments!

98 young poets in grades K-12 submitted 130 poems to McCollough Branch for our first (annual?) Poetry Month celebration and contest. Subjects ranged from the African Plains to a humble Hoosier mushroom, from love and friendship to the wisdom of starting over. We hope that all those who participated enjoyed writing their poems and will keep on writing.

Everyone is invited to our Poetry Awards Reception on Wednesday, April 29 at 6:30 p.m. Winners of the contest will be announced, prizes awarded, and light refreshments will be served. Anyone who submitted a poem to our contest is invited to read one poem aloud at the reception.

Make plans to celebrate with us on April 29.

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mccollough branch events poetry
<![CDATA[Ghosts of the Past (and Present)]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2009/02/13/working-title.aspx Fri, 13 Feb 2009 11:22:00 G2T 1263 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/" target="_blank">Kids Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2009/02/13/working-title.aspx to post your comments!

Have you ever been haunted by a book? I was haunted by a book I couldn’t remember. My mother told me that when I was about three years old, I had a favorite book, one I checked out over and over again. I had absolutely no recollection of that book, and I wondered—what kind of book captured my imagination at that age? Was it a worthy book for a future children’s librarian?

Armed with a partial title, I searched Loganberry Books’ stumper database (http://www.loganberrybooks.com/solved.html ) and discovered Mary’s Scary House by Edith Thacher Hurd, illustrated by her husband Clement Hurd and published in 1956, the year I was born. Well, at least I had good taste! Edith Thacher Hurd authored many children’s books, some of which are still in print. Clement Hurd was the illustrator of the classics Goodnight Moon and Runaway Bunny by Margaret Wise Brown, as well as many others.

My search grew cold. There were no copies of Mary's Scary House remaining in the EVPL system. A few copies (mostly ex-library) could be had from used booksellers at “collectible” prices. I yearned to know more about this book that had helped to shape my love of books.

At Christmas, my husband surprised me with a beautiful, gently used and AUTOGRAPHED copy of Mary’s Scary House.

 

Cover of Mary's Scary House Inscription in my copy of Mary's Scary HousePage from Mary's Scary House

I rediscovered a charming story of a little girl who lives in a haunted house with a reluctant little ghost. Mary decides to take over the little ghost’s job, but learns that it is, indeed, difficult to stay up all night haunting. The happy conclusion is that now the ghost can be her playmate during the day.

I was delighted to be able share the story with my grandchildren. I paired it with a recently published book, Ghosts in the House by Kazuno Kohara. I was struck by the similarties between my old favorite and Kohara's contemporary story and style of illustration. In this new book, an enterprising little witch finds a practical way to deal with the ghosts in her haunted house.

Reading with grandmaGhosts in the HousePage from "Ghosts in the House

Did you have a favorite book when you were very young? What books do you love to share with your young friends?

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picture books books haunted house ghost authors and illustrators
<![CDATA[Are You In the Zone?]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/teens/archive/2009/01/14/are-you-in-the-zone.aspx Wed, 14 Jan 2009 12:33:00 G1T 1125 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/teens/" target="_blank">Teens Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/teens/archive/2009/01/14/are-you-in-the-zone.aspx to post your comments!

Do you have a favorite Twilight Zone episode? As a child I loved Miniature, which starred Robert Duvall (just after his appearance in To Kill a Mockingbird) as a shy young man who falls in love with a doll in a museum dollhouse display. There are many fine scripts and skilled performances in this venerable series. Which ones have stuck with you?

Now there is a series of graphic novels based on Rod Serling's Twilight Zone scripts. The series "honors the original text and even echoes the storyboarding of television, but offers a fresh interpretation." The first of these graphic novels, The Monsters are Due on Maple Street, is a chilling Cold War parable that still resonates with human nature in the triumph of emotion over reason.

Often mischaracterized as science fiction, The Twilight Zone was primarily supernatural and/or speculative fantasy.  As such, it is timeless and deserves this introduction to a new generation in their native medium.

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fantasy Rod Serling Graphic novel Twilight Zone TV
<![CDATA[Christmas with Norman Rockwell]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/12/12/christmas-with-norman-rockwell.aspx Fri, 12 Dec 2008 10:29:00 G12T 1000 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/" target="_blank">Kids Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/12/12/christmas-with-norman-rockwell.aspx to post your comments!

 

Deck the HallsFor a holiday treat, check out Deck the Halls, which pairs the words of the familiar "yuletide carol" with paintings by Norman Rockwell.

Thumb through this book for a short introduction to Rockwell's art and a perspective on Christmas that is by turns joyful and humorous, nostalgic and poignant.

I love the picture on p. 15 of a little boy trying to look up the chimney. What's your favorite image of Christmas?

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books Christmas Norman Rockwell
<![CDATA[We missed you!]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/12/05/we-missed-you.aspx Fri, 05 Dec 2008 15:34:00 G12T 973 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/" target="_blank">Kids Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/12/05/we-missed-you.aspx to post your comments!

If you missed our American Girls book discussion yesterday, you missed some historical Christmas treats. We enjoyed Addy's Sweet Potato Pudding, and Samantha's gingerbread. Peanut butter sandwiches represented Kit's depression-era fare, and an authentic family recipe captured the flavor of Molly's Christmas morning coffee cake.

The coffee cake recipe was given to me years ago by my mother-in-law, Anna Mae Jayne Soper (1933-1985), who was just about Molly's age. For those who attended and asked for it, and for anyone else who wants a taste of history, here is the recipe:

 Dutch Cake

¾ cup sugar

1 cup flour

Butter or shortening the size of egg (I estimate this to be about 3 tablespoons)

1 egg

1 cup milk

Beat above ingredients together, then add:

1 cup flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

1 teaspoon salt

Pour batter into a 9" round or 8" square cake pan. Sprinkle top with sugar and cinnamon before baking. Bake approximately 30 minutes at 375°.

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mccollough branch fiction moms American History family program cake cooking with kids American Girls
<![CDATA[If you love the American Girls...]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/11/29/if-you-love-the-american-girls.aspx Sat, 29 Nov 2008 12:28:00 G11T 942 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/" target="_blank">Kids Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/11/29/if-you-love-the-american-girls.aspx to post your comments!

 

...You'll love An American Girl Christmas at McCollough Branch this Thursday, December 4, at 3:30 pm.

Mothers and daughters (and Grandmothers!) are invited to share the stories of American Girls Addy, Samantha, Kit and Molly. We'll also be enjoying some historical holiday treats!

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mccollough branch fiction American History books
<![CDATA[What does it mean to be poor?]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/11/29/what-does-it-mean-to-be-poor.aspx Sat, 29 Nov 2008 11:50:00 G11T 941 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/" target="_blank">Kids Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/11/29/what-does-it-mean-to-be-poor.aspx to post your comments!

People are talking about tough times economically, and many fear it will get worse. For an idea of what it really means to be poor, try reading Ruth White's Little Audrey. White writes in the forward that the story of four little girls and their parents living in a West Virginia coal mining camp in 1948 is essentially true. It is her family's story, told from the perspective of her older sister Audrey, who was 11 at the time.

The descriptions of a family coping with poverty remind me of the classic A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, but this book is much shorter and could easily be read by a third-grader. There are people who enter their lives for only a short time, but leave a profound mark. Virgil is Audrey's friend who is teased by the other boys, but wisely uses his wits to survive. Miss Stairus is the teacher who wins everyone's heart, even the tough guys'. And then there is precious Betty Gail....

Who has made a difference in your life? Have you lived through a difficult time and come out stronger? You'll appreciate Little Audrey by Ruth White.

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fiction books poverty coal mining West Virginia authors and illustrators
<![CDATA[Honey Cake]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/11/21/honey-cake.aspx Fri, 21 Nov 2008 15:39:00 G11T 912 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/" target="_blank">Kids Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/11/21/honey-cake.aspx to post your comments!

Every year, David's mother bakes a honey cake for Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year celebration. Eating honey cake symbolizes the hope that the new year will be sweet. David's sister Rachel expresses the opinion of all Denmark in 1943: "A sweet year would be a year without Nazis."

For three and a half years, the Germans have occupied Denmark, and now word comes that the Nazis plan to round up Denmark's Jews.  Even with the help of friends, can David's family find a way to leave the country before they are sent to a concentration camp? Secret messages, breathless escapes and courageous resistance will keep you turning the pages of this history-based story. Author Joan Betty Stuchner includes Mama's Honey Cake recipe to help you taste the sweetness of hope for freedom that David's family shared.

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fiction reviews history wartime escape Nazis World War II Germany Jews Denmark cake Joan Betty Stuchner Rosh Hashanah authors and illustrators
<![CDATA[What's the Point?]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/11/13/what-s-the-point.aspx Thu, 13 Nov 2008 09:29:00 G11T 868 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/" target="_blank">Kids Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/11/13/what-s-the-point.aspx to post your comments!

Mel's life was well-rounded until he tripped one day and fell into another dimension where everything is pointy.  No one believes his stories of a pointy world, but he won't give up his tale.

What's the point of  this picture book by the always quirky team of Yorinks & Egielski? Is it a pointed satire on our perception of reality? Does it point to our disjointed experience of life? At what point does Mel trip over the line into fantasy?

 I don't know. Just enjoy the hilarity of What a Trip! by Arthur Yorinks and Richard Egielski.

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picture books point of view books authors and illustrators
<![CDATA[If you Turnip your nose at these books, you'll be in The Doghouse]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/11/03/if-you-turnip-your-nose-at-these-books-you-ll-be-in-the-doghouse.aspx Mon, 03 Nov 2008 12:46:00 G11T 818 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/" target="_blank">Kids Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/11/03/if-you-turnip-your-nose-at-these-books-you-ll-be-in-the-doghouse.aspx to post your comments!

Pig and Mouse have a surprise for Cow's birthday! They are baking the best birthday cake ever!  Duck wants to help, but who wants TURNIPS for their birthday? Who indeed? A Birthday for Cow answers that question, while its companion story The Doghouse raises new questions. Who or what is in the doghouse? Why is it that no one who goes in comes out? And what's this about having Duck for dinner?

Writer/illustrator Jan Thomas's skill with a few simple lines remind me of the Pigeon books by Mo Willems, and wild-eyed duck would probably LOVE to drive a bus (but don't let him!). 

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Mo Willems pig books mouse duck cow authors and illustrators
<![CDATA[Why I Love Being a Children's Librarian, part 2]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/10/17/why-i-love-being-a-children-s-librarian-part-2.aspx Fri, 17 Oct 2008 10:19:00 G10T 737 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/" target="_blank">Kids Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/10/17/why-i-love-being-a-children-s-librarian-part-2.aspx to post your comments!

SLJ Sept 2008The September 2008 issue of School Library Journal reports that there is "a strong, positive link between the amount of children's materials circulated by public libraries and fourth-grade reading scores." The study by the National Center for Education statistics also shows a positive link between reading scores and attendance at library programs.

This is not a surprise to children's librarians, who can provide anecdotal evidence of the love for reading and lifelong learning that develops in the children we see every week in storytime. My anecdote? Every spring, the newspaper publishes pictures of valedictorians from all the area schools. This year, I recognized four of them as kids who had attended my storytimes as preschoolers.

What's your library success story?

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reading test scores
<![CDATA[Focus on Crafts]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/09/19/focus-on-crafts.aspx Fri, 19 Sep 2008 09:30:00 G9T 602 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/" target="_blank">Kids Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/09/19/focus-on-crafts.aspx to post your comments!

Amigurumi bookI always feel creative in the fall. Maybe it's because I start thinking about holiday gifts, or the cooler weather makes me want to curl up under an afghan I'm knitting. Crafts can be a great break from schoolwork and can help you develop your dexterity, creativity and skills sets. Kinesthetic learners can especially enjoy and benefit from crafting.

McCollough Branch is offering a four-week series of crafts for teen and tweens, grades 3-12. On September 23, we'll be making fancy flip flops. All materials (including flip flops) will be provided, but you may bring a pair of flip flops that fit you if you like. Over the next few weeks we'll be doing origami, making no-sew amigurumi and crafting "Gocks" (Goth sock puppets). Join us at 3:00 pm on Tuesday afternoons through October 14. 

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kids teens Japanese tweens flip flops crafts amigurumi origami puppets
<![CDATA[Why I Love Being a Children's Librarian, part 1]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/09/15/why-i-love-being-a-children-s-librarian-part-1.aspx Mon, 15 Sep 2008 16:36:00 G9T 550 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/" target="_blank">Kids Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/09/15/why-i-love-being-a-children-s-librarian-part-1.aspx to post your comments!

I was going through some old papers the other day and found the following gem. I had collected it in 2002 after a child typing on one of the library computers left it on screen. I printed it, and here it is, exactly as I found it:

To day is my brthday I am seven yerse olde I got lots uv  presins  and  my brother is dumb

Triumph and tragedy in fewer than twenty words.  

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library computers kids
<![CDATA[Greg Heffley fans, Unite!]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/09/10/greg-heffly-fans-unite.aspx Wed, 10 Sep 2008 16:24:00 G9T 490 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/" target="_blank">Kids Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/09/10/greg-heffly-fans-unite.aspx to post your comments!

Book Cover, Rodrick Rules

 Book Jacket, Diary of a Wimpy Kid

For some wacky fun, join us at McCollough Branch for "Diary of a Wimpy Kid," a program based on the popular book series by Jeff Kinney. We'll have some crazy activities, mostly involving toilet paper, and you can earn "Mom Bucks" just like Greg and Rodrick.

Be there at 3:00 p.m. Thursday, September 11, in McCollough Branch's meeting room.  And in the meantime, tell me what you think of Greg Heffley's journals.

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mccollough branch fiction events Greg Heffley Jeff Kinney Diary of a Wimpy Kid Rodrick Rules books
<![CDATA[A World without Superman?]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/08/30/a-world-without-superman.aspx Sat, 30 Aug 2008 10:16:00 G8T 336 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/" target="_blank">Kids Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/08/30/a-world-without-superman.aspx to post your comments!

If you have ever worn a cape or attempted to fly, as I have, you will want to check out Boys of Steel: The Creators of Superman. Superman seems to have always existed, but he was created in 1934 by writer Jerry Siegel and illustrator Joe Shuster, who were barely out of high school at the time. Superman almost didn't get off the ground, as one publisher after another turned down the idea. In 1938, Superman took off and the world was never the same.

Retro comic-style art by Ross McDonald vibrantly illustrates Marc Tyler Nobleman's story of two very ordinary boys who gave us a superstar.

Other Super links:

Metropolis, home of Superman

Superman Homepage

DC Comics

 

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nonfiction picture books Superman books
<![CDATA[Lost and Found]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/08/29/lost-and-found.aspx Fri, 29 Aug 2008 13:54:00 G8T 328 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/" target="_blank">Kids Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/08/29/lost-and-found.aspx to post your comments!

Andrew Clements has another winner in his signature series of school stories with Lost and Found.

Jay Grayson had only average expectations for his new school when he arrived on the first day. But when Jay's name-and only Jay's name-was called during roll call, he conveniently forgot that he had a note for the office explaining his identical twin brother's absence. The groundwork was set for a grand experiment. What would it be like to be one person, instead of half a set?

As the mother of twins, I watched my boys (who are not identical) struggle with building their individuality during adolescence.  Questions of identity and uniqueness will resonate with preteens even if they are not twins.

Buy it from Amazon here to benefit the Public Library Friends.

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fiction Andrew Clements books
<![CDATA[I Spy New Easy Readers]]> http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/08/10/i-spy-new-easy-readers.aspx Sun, 10 Aug 2008 13:33:00 G8T 195 mrsweasley@evpl Posted to the <a href="http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/" target="_blank">Kids Blog</a> on EVPL Communities. View the original post at http://evpl.org/community/blogs/kids/archive/2008/08/10/i-spy-new-easy-readers.aspx to post your comments!

If you like the Walter Wick/Jean Marzollo I Spy books, you'll be happy to learn that there are now easy reader editions available. Like the earlier books in the I Spy family, the easy readers are themed, with titles like I Spy a Pumpkin and I Spy a School Bus.

 I Spy a School Bus

The illustrations are cropped versions of photographs from the original picture puzzle series, so the younger reader will not be overwhelmed. The accompanying rhymes ask readers to find only five or six objects per page. Additional puzzles at the back of the book help children identify rhyming words, words that start with the same letter, etc.

Offer these books to kids who like to work jigsaw puzzles or solve riddles, and you'll sharpen both their reading and puzzle-solving skills.

 

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rhyme riddles I Spy puzzles books